Archive for the ‘crochet’ Category

Finished!

June 15, 2010

Hat

Oh, I am so pleased with this. Look, those are cables; crochet cables. Crochet cables!  I expect everyone else in the world has been crocheting cables since they were toddlers, but they are new to me.  There was much swearing and unravelling of swatches before I got the hang of them, though that’s mainly because I was trying to teach myself to do them with the aid of a pattern for a swatch in a 40 year old book that said something like this: 1 RtF round each of next 2RtF, 1 RdtF into next RtF, then keeping hook at front of work but behind the 2Rtdf just worked work Cr5B….”  WTF????

This pic doesn’t do the hat justice at all. Obviously, the best thing to do would be to take a picture of it on my head, so you can see it properly, but that would involve not only washing my hair, but also blow-drying it, and either taking a picture of the back of my head, or having to put on make-up, and I can’t be bothered to do any of those things today.  Or most days, really.

Sock monkey

Oh dear, he’s a bit ugly, this sock monkey.  Never mind; he’s off to Australia where he can give someone else nightmares.

Baby cardigan

For a new little baby, born in April.  I’m hoping this is a size 6 – 12 months, so if I don’t get round to posting it off to the UK straight away it won’t matter…

Doll.

Yup, no change.  Still not finished.

And something new in progress…

Based on this Cath Kidston tea cosy, though mine isn’t going to be a tea cosy.  I’m not quite sure what mine’s going to be, yet, but tea cosy is definitely not one of the options.

(Sorry about the crappy pics.  Mid-winter here…)

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Moriarty: two colour stripey crochet beanie

June 12, 2010

Toddler sized beanie made in Debbie Bliss Pure Cotton, colours 21 and 26
Christmas presents (8)

Toddler sized beanie made in Rowan Cashsoft colours 12 (blue) and 24 (pink)Christmas presents (7)

Men’s size beanie made in Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran – can’t remember the colours!Christmas presents (2)

Moriarty is a two coloured beanie, crocheted in a spiral, which means it doesn’t have a seam, but it does have a slight jag at the end of the hat, though if you do the version with the flower, this won’t show. If you don’t want a jag, then join each round using a slip stitch rather than crochet in a spiral.

 

Sizes

These are the sizes I use for my hats:

1 2 3 4
Size guide Toddler Child Woman Man
Circumference 45 cm(18 inches) 50 cm(20 inches) 55 cm(22 inches) 60 cm(24 inches)
Approximate length* 15 cm(6 inches) 17.5 cm(6.5 inches) 19.5 cm(7.5 inches) 21.5 cm(8.5 inches)

*if you want a longer or shorter hat, just add or subtract rows accordingly.

 

Materials

I made these with Debbie Bliss Pure Cotton, Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran and, Rowan Cashsoft Aran, so any Aran weight yarn should work.  For the children’s sizes you’ll need about  half a ball/ 45 metres of each colour, while the adult sizes use about a ball or 90m of each colour (sorry these are such rough estimates – I didn’t write down the exact amount of yarn I used when I made all these hats).

 

Stitches used

  • dc – double crochet (American single crochet)
  • tc – treble crochet (American double crochet)

 

Gauge

12 stitches and 18 rows to 10 cm or 4 inches measured over double crochet using a 5 mm hook, though it’s more important to get the correct number of stitches than the correct number of rows as it’s so easy to change the length of the hat if needed.

 

Method

This hat is worked in a spiral.  At the end of each round, pull the yarn through the last stitch so you have a big loop, as that will prevent you accidentally unravelling the stitches while you work on the next round.

Shaping the crown

To start: with your main colour, make an adjustable ring by making a loop with your yarn with the tail end of the yarn in front of the working yarn, insert your hook into the loop and draw the working yarn through, then chain 1.  I’d show you how to do this myself, but I accidentally ripped off my thumbnail yesterday and my hands are in no fit state to appear in photographs, but there is a good tutorial with pictures here.

Round 1: dc six times into the adjustable ring, then pull the yarn through so you have a big loop and remove the hook – remember to do this on every round so that you don’t accidentally unravel your stitches.

Pic 1: end of round 1

Round 2: Join contrasting yarn into the adjustable ring, pull the ring closed, then dc twice into each of the stitches in the previous round.  (12 stitches)

Pic 2: joining contrasting yarn

Pic 3: end of round 2

Round 3: 1 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (12 stitches)

Pic 4: end of round 3

Round 4: 2 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (24 stitches)

Pic 5: end of round 4

Round 5: 1 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (24 stitches)

Round 6: 2dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next stitch.  Repeat until end.  (36 stitches)

Round 7: 1 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (36 stitches)

Round 8: 2dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next two stitches.  Repeat until end.  (48 stitches)

Round 9: 1 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (48 stitches)

Round 10: Toddler size only – 2 dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next 7 stitches. Repeat until end.  (54 stitches)

Round 10: All other sizes – 2 dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next three stitches.  Repeat until end. (60 stitches)

That’s the end of the crown shaping for the children’s sizes.  For the adult sizes, continue as follows:

Round 11: 1 dc into each stitch of previous round.  (60 stitches)

Round 12:  Women’s size only – 2 dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next 9 stitches.  Repeat until end.  (66 stitches)

Round 12: Men’s size only – 2 dc into first stitch, then 1 dc into next four stitches.  Repeat until end.  (72 stitches)

Body of hat

For the body of the hat continue crocheting without increasing for the number of rounds shown below.   On the final round, which should be in the contrasting colour. dc up to the last but one stitch, then slip stitch into the last stitch, and cut yarn leaving a loose end to weave in.

Toddler size: 12 rounds (to make a total of 22 rounds so far)

Child size:  16 rounds (to make a total of 26 rounds so far)

Women’s size:  16 rounds (to make a total of 28 rounds so far)

Men’s size:  20 rounds (to make a total of 32 rounds so far)

Then, with the main colour, dc into each stitch for five more rounds for the children’s sizes and seven more rounds for the adult sizes, cast off, and weave in ends.  You should have a total of 27 rounds for the toddler size, 31 rounds for the children’s size, 35 rounds for the women’s size and 39 rounds for the men’s size.

Flowers

Make an adjustable ring as before

Round 1:  9 dc into ring, and join round with a slip stitch

Round 2:  chain 1 (counts as first dc) then do 3 treble crochet into first stitch, and slip stitch into next.  *Into next stitch do 1 double crochet and 3 trebles, then slip stitch into next stitch.  Repeat from * to end. Weave in ends, and sew onto hat.

Unfinished

May 26, 2010

Unfinished doll.

Unfinished hat.

Unfinished baby cardigan.

Unfinished sock monkey.

Flowers for my mother-in-law

March 2, 2010

I was wondering what to make my mother-in-law for her birthday, when the Lion Brand Yarn newsletter popped into my inbox, containing this pattern for amigurumi flowers, which I thought would be just the thing.

Flowers for web

I made mine with remnants of Debbie Bliss cashmerino chunky, and made 24 flowers instead of the 18 the pattern called for, and I left out the leaves as well. I think it’s pretty cute, and it was lovely and quick to make.

Hello!

December 28, 2009

Oh dear, I didn’t mean to disappear for so long, but the last few weeks have been busy, busy, busy. I hope you all had lovely Christmases. We had a beautiful, sunny day up here, and spent the day hanging around on the beach and stuffing ourselves silly with lots of lovely food. It was the hottest Christmas we’ve had since we moved to New Zealand, and was perfectly lovely.

So, would you like to know how my Christmas present making went in the end? Originally, I was planning to make 20 gifts, but one of those was a commission for a friend, and she said she didn’t need it by Christmas, which was a relief. I then abandoned another three, leaving a total of 16 gifts to make. And I got 14 of them made and posted in time for Christmas – woohoo!!

I made a lot of hats:

Two little hats for my god-daughter and her sister:

Two little hats for two little girls

And two little hats for my nephew and my godson:

Two little hats for two little boys

A much bigger hat for my brother:

Christmas presents (2)

And another for my brother-in-law:

Christmas presents (3)

UPDATE: the pattern for the hats above is now available here.

A Durango and Robin’s Egg hat for my step-mother:

Christmas presents (5)

And a modified version of that for my dad:

Christmas presents (6)

But I didn’t just make hats – oh no. I also made slippers. Three pairs in all – one for my mum, one for my sister, and one for my friend.

Christmas presents (4)

For my niece and my eldest god-daughter I made tutus using this tutorial. I couldn’t get rolls of tulle locally, so had to use normal tulle and cut it into strips, which took ages. I used 6 metres of 54 inch wide tulle for each one, and cut it into strips 4 inches wide by 36 inches long. But they came out lovely and puffy – I had to squash them down into really small packages to post to the UK.

Christmas presents

And finally, I made a hooded cardigan for my middle god-daughter.

Hooded cardigan

Another hat

November 15, 2009

Two colour spiral beanie

This one was made with Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Chunky, in colours 018 (navy blue) and 020 (airforce blue).

I really must write this pattern down so I don’t have to keep working it out each time.

UPDATE: pattern now available here!

More slippers

November 14, 2009

This time for my friend’s other daughter.

More slippers

On the day of the girl’s birthday, I was chatting to my friend on facebook, and said, “Did the slippers arrive in time?”

“YES! And she is dancing in front of me RIGHT NOW saying ‘I love my new slippers’ and staring at them, not a word of a lie. RIGHT NOW.”

(Pattern here.)

Taking the fun out of crafting

October 9, 2009

You know, I’m really pleased with the slippers I designed. I spent hours looking for patterns for crocheted Mary-Jane slippers, and I couldn’t find any in the style I wanted, or even any close enough that I could modify a pattern to make my own. So, I sat down with a tape measure, pencil and paper, made a few sketches, drew the design of the slipper I wanted on my foot with marker pen, measured all the dimensions, researched international shoe sizes on the internet, and set about designing a pattern of my own. And it took ages – the swatching, the calculations, the planning on graph paper, the crocheting, taking notes, frogging, re-crocheting, taking more notes, frogging again… and again… but I ended up with a pair of slippers that I was really pleased with, and that were exactly as I’d envisaged they would be.

When they were done, and I had transcribed all my notes and doodles, I was happy to publish the pattern here, free of charge, for other people to use, because I have found so much inspiration on the internet from other crafters, and wanted to give something back.  And it’s been lovely to see people adding the pattern to their Ravelry queues, posting pictures of the slippers they’ve made, and reading all of the lovely comments and emails I’ve received about them.

But now, I am sitting here wishing I had just kept my pattern to myself. Why? Because someone is selling slippers on etsy that are exactly the same as my design. I studied all of her photos and her slippers are identical in every detail to mine, down to the number of stitches, the number of rows, the design and the construction. So I contacted the seller via etsy asking if she had used my pattern to make them, and saying if she had then please note that she is not permitted to sell items made using my pattern. She denied using my pattern; she said, “I didn’t use your pattern… I just google imaged slippers and improvised. I apologize if you find them similar.” and offered to send me the pattern she had made.

If, as she said, she didn’t use my pattern but instead improvised a design based on google images, then either it’s a pretty big coincidence that she came up with the exact same design as me, or she must have copied my design from my images.

I wish I could be more philosophical about this, and just shrug it off, but right now I just feel really sad, and bloody cross. I’ve been googling “etsy and copyright violations” for hours today to try to decide what to do, and came across some thoughtful posts from people on the same issue, such as this one from Melissa at tiny happy, this one from chile con yarne, and this one from Flint Knits.

I haven’t yet decided what I will do – the similarity between her slippers and mine is so big that I don’t believe it’s a coincidence. (She is also selling some other items that look as if they are made from other free patterns on the internet, such as the lovely Durango hat by Catherine Lindsay.)  But can I prove that she violated my copyright? I don’t know. Can I be bothered? Again, I don’t know.  But what I do know is that I am going to think twice about posting anything I design on this website in future, because I really don’t want to feel the way I’ve been feeling today ever again.

Free pattern for crocheted Mary-Jane slippers

September 3, 2009

Mary-Jane slippers

Crocheted Mary Jane slippers

Mary-Jane slippers

Mary-Jane slippers

Mary-Jane slippers

Fancy making some slippers?  Here’s the pattern I devised for the Mary-Jane slippers I made for my friend.  Each slipper is made in one piece, so there are no seams, and they are made in double crochet (single crochet if you’re American).

Please note: this free pattern is not for resale. All rights reserved. No part of the pattern may be reproduced in any form. The written instructions, photographs, design, and pattern are intended for personal, non-commercial use only i.e. you are not permitted to sell any items made using this pattern.

I have checked and re-checked the pattern, but if you use it and find any mistakes, or if anything is unclear, please do not hesitate to email me at thelittlehousebythesea at hotmail dot com.  Oh, and if you make these, please add a pic of them to the Flickr group.

Materials

  • Debbie Bliss Pure Cotton or any other Aran weight yarn – 50g/ 82m of main colour and a few metres (about 8.5 m) in contrasting colour
  • Hook size 5 mm
  • Four pieces of contrasting yarn to use as markers
  • 2 buttons – the ones I used have a diameter of 1.5 cm.
  • Large blunt ended needle

Stitches used

  • ch – chain
  • dc – double crochet (single crochet if you’re American)
  • dc2tog – double crochet two stitches together (decrease)

Gauge

12 stitches and 18 rows to 10 cm or 4 inches measured over double crochet using a 5 mm hook.

Sizing

At the gauge stated above, the slippers will fit UK size 4 – 6.5 (EU size 37 – 39.5, US size 6.5 – 9).  They might fit a UK size 7 (EU 40, US 9.5) but I haven’t been able to get someone with this size feet to try them on to check.

It doesn’t matter too much if your gauge is not exact because the slippers are designed to stretch to fit, but you don’t want your gauge to be too different as then your slippers might not fit.  If your feet at are at the smaller end of the range and you are getting a couple more than 12 stitches to 10cm/ 4 inches, then the slippers will probably still fit, especially if you are using wool rather than cotton.  If not, try a larger hook size.  If your feet are at the larger end of the range and you are getting fewer stitches to 10 cm/ 4 inches, then, again, the slippers will probably still fit, but if not, try a smaller hook size.

METHOD

Toe-cap

The toe-cap is worked in one continuous round, or spiral as follows:

Foundation chain: using 5 mm hook, chain 6.

Round 1: dc into second chain from hook, dc into next 3 chains, 3 dc into last chain, then continue double-crocheting up the other side of chain as follows: dc into next three chains, 2dc in last chain (12 stitches).

Picture 1: the first round

Blog - picture 1

Round 2: dc into each of next 5 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch, dc into each of next 5 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch (16 stitches)

Round 3: dc into each of next 6 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch, dc into each of next 7 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch, dc into next stitch (20 stitches)

Round 4: dc into each of next 7 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch, dc into each of next 9 stitches, 3 dc into next stitch, dc into next 2 stitches (24 stitches)

Round 5: dc into each stitch (24 stitches)

Round 6: dc into each stitch (24 stitches)

Sole

The sole continues on from the toe-cap, and is worked in rows as follows:

Row 1: dc into first 8 stitches of round 6.  Mark first and last stitch in the row, and also the two stitches of the toe-cap on either side of the row, as shown in picture 2.  1 chain. Turn. (8 stitches)

Picture 2: stitches marked with contrasting yarn

Blog - picture 2

Row 2: dc into each stitch. 1 chain. Turn. (8 stitches)

Rows 3 – 13: as row 2.

Row 14: 2 dc into first stitch, dc into next 6 stitches, 2 dc into last stitch. (10 stitches). 1 chain.  Turn.

Row 15: dc into each stitch. 1 chain.  Turn.  (10 stitches)

Rows 16 – 19: as row 15.

Row 20: 2 dc into first stitch, dc into next 8 stitches, 2 dc into last stitch.  1 chain. Turn. (12 stitches)

Row 21: dc into each stitch.  1 chain. Turn. (12 stitches).

Rows 22-23: as row 21.

Row 24: dc into first 2 stitches, dc2tog, dc into next 4 stitches, dc2tog, dc into last 2 stitches. 1 chain.  Turn. (10 stitches)

Row 25: dc into first 2 stitches, dc2tog, dc into next 2 stitches, dc2tog, dc into last 2 stitches. 1 chain.  Turn. (8 stitches)

Row 26: dc into first 2 stitches, dc2tog. dc2tog, dc into last 2 stitches. 1 chain.  Turn.  (6 stitches)

Row 27: dc into first stitch. dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into last stitch. (4 stitches).  DO NOT TURN.  With contrasting thread mark first and last stitches in rows 26 and 27.

Picture 3: toe-cap and sole, showing marked stitches

Blog - picture 3

Upper

You will now work the rest of the slipper in rounds.

Round 1: with bottom of sole facing you, dc into each row end (26 stitches) dc into each stitch on toe-cap (17 stitches) dc up the row ends on the other side (26 stitches) and dc into the 4 stitches on the back. (73 stitches).  Move the markers as you crochet so that the ends of the each side, toe-cap and back are marked.

Round 2: repeat round 1

In rounds 3 – 6 you will decrease at both ends of each side, and at each side of the toe-cap by double-crocheting together the first two and last two stitches of both sides and the toe-cap as follows:

Round 3: dc2tog, dc into next 22 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 13 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 22 stitches, dc2 tog, dc into last 4 stitches (67 stitches)

Round 4: dc2tog, dc into next 20 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 11 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 20 stitches, dc2 tog, dc into last 4 stitches (61 stitches)

Round 5: dc2tog, dc into next 18 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 9 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 18 stitches, dc2 tog, dc into last 4 stitches (55 stitches)

Round 6: dc2tog, dc into next 16 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 7 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 16 stitches, dc2tog, dc into last 3 stitches, and slip stitch into last stitch. Cut yarn leaving a loose end to weave in. (49 stitches)

The final two rounds are worked in a contrasting yarn. First of all you make a chain and button hole for the strap, and then you join the yarn to the slippers and continue shaping the upper as follows:

Strap: With colour for trim, chain 5. Slip stitch into chain furthest from hook to form a loop (this will be the buttonhole: if your buttons have a diameter greater than 1.5 cm, then you may need to increase the size of this loop).  Then chain 16.

Picture 4: strap

Blog - picture 4

 

Left slipper

Round 7: Join chain to left slipper on the right side in the 8th stitch from the front right corner (see picture 5 ). You will then continue crocheting around the upper, decreasing at the corners and heel as in rounds 3 – 6 as follows: dc into next 7 stitches, dc2tog, dc into 4 stitches along back of slipper, dc2tog, dc into next 14 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 5 stitches (across toe-cap) dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 7 stitches (the last dc goes into the same stitch that you joined the chain to the slipper).  Then dc up one side of the chain you made (16 stitches), dc into each chain in the loop (5 stitches), and dc back down the other side of the chain (16 stitches).

Picture 5: joining the strap to the left slipper

Blog - picture 5b

Picture 6:round 7, just before crocheting up the strap

Blog - picture 6

Right slipper

Round 7: Join chain to right slipper on the left side in the 8th stitch from the front left corner. You will then continue crocheting around the upper, decreasing at the corners and heel as in rounds 3 – 6 as follows: dc into next 6 stitches, dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next five stitches (across toe-cap), dc2tog, dc2tog, dc into next 14 stitches, dc2tog, dc into 4 stitches, dc2tog, dc into next 8 stitches (the last dc goes into the same stitch that you joined the chain to the slipper).  Then dc up one side of the chain you made (16 stitches), dc into each chain in the loop (5 stitches), and dc back down the other side of the chain (16 stitches).

Both slippers

Round 8: dc into each dc along top of slipper until you come back to the strap, then cast off.

To finish: Weave in ends, and sew on buttons.

Crocheted Mary-Jane slippers

September 3, 2009

I can finally tick something off my to do list:

Crocheted Mary Jane slippers

I made this pair of slippers for a friend of mine. Originally, she asked me to make her a hat, but it had to be cotton, not wool, though cashmere would probably be okay, but wouldn’t it shed? And it had to be tight. And have ear flaps. And be flattering. Oh, and she hates hats. She only wears them out of necessity, because she thinks all hats make her look ugly and stupid. Hmmm. What about a pair of slippers instead? I asked. “Oh yes. I love slippers.” she said.

So slippers it was.

I thought Mary-Jane slippers would be the sort of thing that there are loads of free patterns for, but I searched and searched on Ravelry and Google, but none of the patterns were like the ones I had in my head. Mainly, I didn’t want any seams, and I wanted the upper to be in double crochet all round, and the heel to be rounded… so I designed my own. And I wrote the pattern down so I could make sure the second slipper matched the first, and as soon as I have transcribed my scribbles, I’ll post the pattern here. UPDATE: here it is!

I took a photo of these last night to send to my friend to show her what they look like, and she emailed back saying “TAKE THEM OFF NOW – THEY’RE MINE”. I think she likes them.